Welcome to Deu Dental Care

At Deu Dental Care, our practice ethos is to provide high quality dentistry in a caring environment so you as the patient enjoys the dental visit. Our dentists provide stunning cosmetic dental treatments including porcelain veneers, crowns, white fillings and teeth whitening to create the perfect smile makeovers.


 

Our Preventative dental treatments include hygienist services for decay and gum disease as well as fresh breath clinics. All our routine examinations include screening for mouth cancer.

We have received the prestigous BDA Good Practice Scheme Award which reflects our extremely high standards. We have 2 dental practices in Leeds and look forward to seeing you!
 
Deu Dental Care Headingley

10 Otley Road
Leeds LS6 2AD

Tel: 0113 278 4000
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Deu Dental Care Cookridge

68 Otley Old Road
Leeds LS16 6LQ

Tel: 0113 261 1400
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Our Headingley facilities include onsite parking, disabled access and disabled toilets. Cookridge facilities include nearby street parking and disabled access.
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Cosmetic dentists in Leeds, West Yorkshire, at Deu Health, our dentists offer private dental treatment and cosmetic dentistry. Learn more about our cosmetic dentistry treatments including teeth whitening, crowns, bridges, porcelain veneers, white fillings, dental implants, missing teeth or broken tooth. Our Leeds dentists provide smile makeovers to improve your confidence, making you look and feel younger with cleaner teeth, whiter teeth and healthier teeth. If you have a dental emergency in Leeds, West Yorkshire, contact our Leeds dentists immediately so we can arrange a dental appointment as soon as possible. Nervous patients, afraid of the dentist or scared of dental treatment, are welcomed and provided with the highest quality of care.

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Welcome to Deu Health Dental Care in Leeds. We have two dental practices in Leeds, both provide a complete range of dental treatments. One locates on 10 Otley Road, Leeds, LS6 2AD and one locates on 68 Otley Old Road, Leeds, LS16 6LQ. If you are new to Leeds and lare ooking for dental services we hope that the site will inform and guide you through some essential information on our treatments including teeth whitening, procelain veneers, white fillings, dental crowns, dental bridges and oral hygiene services.

Our Leeds cosmetic dentists provide cosmetic dental treatments including:
Teeth Whitening
Our Leeds teeth whitening treatment can whiten teeth by up to several shades, brightening your teeth dramatically. Gel is applied to your teeth by a highly experienced leeds dentist in a customised tray for 1 hour in the surgery under supervision and then at home for just one week to achieve your new brighter, whiter and confident smile.
Veneers
Porcelain veneers can improve the colour, shape and position of teeth. A precise shade of porcelain can be chosen to give the right colour to improve a single discoloured or stained tooth or to lighten front teeth (usually the upper ones) generally.
White Fillings
Dental decay happens when the enamel and dentine of a tooth become softened by acid attack, producing a cavity (hole). If the decay is not too serious, our cosmetic dentist will remove all the decay and restore the tooth with a white (tooth coloured) filling. We can also safely replace silver (amalgam) fillings.

Our Leeds restorative dentists provide restorative dental treatments including:
Crowns & Bridges to Replace Missing Teeth
A crown is an artificial restoration that fits over the remaining part of a prepared tooth, making it strong and giving it the shape of a natural tooth.
A crown is sometimes known as a ‘cap’. Crowns are an ideal restoration for teeth that have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or a very large filling.
A crown could be used for a number of other reasons, for instance:
you may have discoloured fillings and would like to improve the appearance of the tooth
you may have had a root filling which will need a crown to protect it
it may help hold a bridge or denture firmly in place.

There are two main ways to replace missing teeth. The first is with a removable false tooth or teeth – a partial denture. The second is with a fixed bridge.

A bridge is usually used where there are fewer teeth to replace, or when the missing teeth are only on one side of the mouth. Bridges are usually made of a precious metal base. If the bridge will show, porcelain is then bonded to the base. Sometimes, there are other non-precious metals used in the base to reduce the cost. You should replace missing teeth for a number of reasons. Your appearance is one reason. Another is that the gap left by a missing tooth can mean greater strain is put on the teeth at either side. A gap can also mean your ‘bite’ is affected, because the teeth next to the space can lean into the gap and alter the way the upper and lower teeth bite together. This can then lead to food getting packed into the gap, which causes both decay and gum disease.

FAQs on Teeth Whitening in Leeds
Q What does tooth whitening do?

A Tooth whitening can be a highly effective, yet very simple way, of lightening the colour of teeth without removing any of the tooth surface. It cannot make a colour change, but lightens the existing colour.

Q What does the procedure involve?

A The dentist applies a chemical barrier to the gums, which will protect them during the whitening process. The whitening solution is then applied to the teeth and the chemical is then activated using heat, or heat and light combined.
Once the whitening process is finished the barrier will be easily removed in one piece. If the tooth has been root treated, the canal, which previously contained the nerve, may be reopened and the whitening product is put in.

Q How long does the procedure take?

A The process would normally take over an hour but your dentist will advise you on your specific requirements.

Q Will I be happy with the results?

A Treatment results may vary depending on the original shade of the teeth. Teeth will tend to darken slightly over time. The effect lasts for around 1 to 3 years, although sometimes it can last longer.

Q When might whitening not work?

A Whitening can only lighten your existing tooth colour. For a change to specific chosen shade veneering is another option. Whitening also works on natural teeth. It will not work on any type of 'false’ teeth. This includes dentures, crowns and veneers. If dentures are stained or discoloured, it may be worth visiting the dentist and asking him or her to clean them. Stained veneers, crowns and dentures may need replacing. Again, ask your dentist.

Q How do I care for my teeth after whitening?

A Talk to your dentist about maintaining the colour of your teeth, and the products that are available for keeping the effect. Each individual’s lifestyle needs to be assessed but good oral hygiene and regular visits to the hygienist will help to maintain the effect for longer. Some people find that their teeth are sensitive for the first few days after treatment, but this wears off after a short while. Your dentist will advise you of the products you can use to counteract this.

FAQs Tray Whitening in Leeds

Q What does tooth whitening do?

A Tooth whitening can be a highly effective, yet very simple way, of lightening the colour of teeth without removing any of the tooth surface. It cannot make a colour change, but lightens the existing colour.

Q What does the procedure involve?

A In a live tooth the dentist applies the whitening product using a specially made tray which fits into the mouth like a gum shield. The chemical is then activated using heat, or heat and light combined. The active ingredient in the product is normally hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide.

If the tooth has been root treated, the canal, which previously contained the nerve, may be reopened and the whitening product is put in.

In both cases, the procedure needs to be repeated until the right shade is reached.

Q How long does the procedure take?

A First of all you will need 2 or 3 visits to your dentist. Your dentist will need to make a mouthguard and will need to take impressions for this at the first appointment. Once your dentist has started the treatment, you will have to continue the treatment at home. This will mean applying the bleach regularly over 2-4 weeks for 30 minutes to 1 hour at a time.
However, some newer products can be applied for up to 8 hours at a time, which means that a satisfactory result can be obtained in as little as 1 week.

Q Why would my teeth need to be bleached?

A Everyone is different; and just as our hair and skin colour varies, so do our teeth. Some teeth have a yellowish tinge, some are more beige – very few are actually ‘white’. Teeth also yellow with age can become stained on the surface by food and drinks such as tea, coffee and blackcurrant. Calculus (tartar) can also affect the colour of the teeth. Some people may have staining inside their teeth. This can be caused by certain antibiotics or tiny cracks in the teeth, which take up the stain.
Q Will I be happy with the results?

A Treatment results may vary depending on the original shade of the teeth. Teeth will tend to darken slightly over time. The effect lasts for around 1 to 3 years, although sometimes it can last longer. Some people find that their teeth are sensitive for the first few days after treatment, but this wears off after a short while.

Q What about home kits?

A Over-the-counter kits are not recommended as they contain only a small amount of hydrogen peroxide which makes the product less effective. Some also contain mild acids, while others are abrasive. Although these products are cheaper, whitening is a complicated treatment procedure and should only be carried out by a dentist after a thorough examination and assessment of your teeth. It is very important to follow the instructions your dentist gives you, and to make sure that you go for any follow-up appointments recommended

Q When might whitening not work?

A Whitening can only lighten your existing tooth colour. For a change to specific chosen shade veneering is another option. Whitening also works on natural teeth. It will not work on any type of 'false’ teeth. This includes dentures, crowns and veneers. If dentures are stained or discoloured, it may be worth visiting the dentist and asking him or her to clean them. Stained veneers, crowns and dentures may need replacing. Again, ask your dentist.

Q What about whitening toothpaste?

A There are now several whitening toothpastes you can buy. Although they do not affect the natural colour of the tooth, they are effective at removing staining and therefore improving the overall appearance of the tooth. Whitening toothpaste may also help to keep up the appearance, once teeth have been professionally whitened.

FAQs on Dental Bridges in Leeds

Q Why should I replace missing teeth?

A Your appearance is one reason. Another is that the gap left by a missing tooth can mean greater strain on the teeth at either side. A gap can also mean your ‘bite’ is affected, because the teeth next to the space can lean into the gap and alter the way the upper and lower teeth bite together. This can then lead to food getting packed into the gap, which causes both decay and gum disease.

Q How are missing teeth replaced?

A This depends on the number of teeth missing and on where they are in the mouth. The condition of the other teeth also affects the decision. There are two main two ways to replace the missing teeth. The first is with a removable false tooth or teeth – a partial denture. The second is with a fixed bridge. A bridge is usually used where there are fewer teeth to replace, or when the missing teeth are only on one side of the mouth.

Q Can I always have a bridge to replace missing teeth?

A Yes, if you have enough strong teeth with good bone support. Your dentist will help you decide the best way of replacing your missing teeth within your budget.

Q What are bridges made of?

A Bridges are usually made of a precious metal base. If the bridge will show, porcelain is then bonded to the base. Sometimes, there are other non-precious metals used in the base to reduce the cost.

Q Are bridges expensive?

A Although a bridge may seem expensive it will last many years. It will also improve your appearance and bite. A bridge uses the considerable skill of the dentist and technician, and in this way, it’s similar to ordering a piece of hand-made jewellery. The materials are also expensive so it's fair to say a bridge will not be the cheapest treatment you have ever had.

Q How do I look after my bridge?

A You need to clean your bridge every day, to prevent problems such as bad breath and gum disease. You also have to clean under the false tooth every day. Your dentist or hygienist will show you how to use a bridge needle or special floss, as a normal toothbrush cannot reach.

Q Are there other methods for fixing false teeth?
A There are other methods, such as using a combination of crowns and partial dentures that can keep the retaining clips out of sight. These are quite specialised dentures, so you should ask your dentist about them. You can also have teeth implanted, ask your dentist for more information. Remember that it’s as important to care for your remaining teeth as it is to replace the missing ones.

Q Are there different types of bridge?

A Yes, there are different types of bridge which use different fixing methods. Your dentist will choose the most effective and conservative bridge for your personal situation.

FAQs on Dental Crowns in Leeds

Q What is a crown?

A Crowns are an ideal way to rebuild teeth which have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or a very large filling. The crown fits right over the remaining part of the tooth, making it strong and giving it the shape and contour of a natural tooth. Crowns are sometimes also known as ‘caps’. An ‘Anterior Crown’ is a crown fitted to the front eight teeth.

Q Why would I need a crown?

A There are a number of reasons. For instance:

the tooth may have been weakened by having a very large filling
you may have discoloured fillings and would like to improve the appearance of the tooth
you may have had a root filling which will need a crown to protect it
you may have had an accident and damaged the tooth
it may help hold a bridge or denture firmly in place.
Q What are crowns made of?

A Crowns are made of a variety of materials and new materials are being introduced all the time. Here are some of the options available at present:

Porcelain bonded to precious metal: this is what most crowns are made from. A precious metal base is made and layers of porcelain are then applied over it.
Porcelain: these crowns are not as strong as bonded crowns but they can look very natural and are most often used for front teeth.
Porcelain and composite: porcelain and composite resin materials can sometimes look the most natural. However, these crowns are not as strong as bonded metal crowns.
Glass: these crowns look very natural and are used on both front and back teeth.
Precious metal (gold and palladium): these crowns are very strong and hard-wearing, but are not usually used at the front of the mouth, where they are highly visible.
Q How is a tooth prepared for a crown?

A The dentist will prepare the tooth to the ideal shape for the crown. This will mean removing most of the outer surface, and leaving a strong inner ‘core’. The amount of the tooth removed will be the same as the thickness of the crown to be fitted. Once the tooth is shaped, the dentist will take an impression of the prepared tooth, one of the opposite jaw and possibly another to mark the way you bite together. The impressions will be given to the technician, along with any other information they need to make the crown.
Q Who makes the crown?

A The impressions and information about the shade of your teeth will be given to a dental technician who will be skilled in making crowns. They will make models of your mouth and make the crown on these to be sure that the crown fits perfectly.

Q Will the crown be noticeable?

A No. The crown will be made to match your other teeth exactly. The shade of the neighbouring teeth will be recorded, to make sure that the colour looks natural and matches the surrounding teeth. A temporary crown, usually made in plastic, will be fitted at the end of the first appointment to last until the permanent one is ready. These temporary crowns may be more noticeable, but they are only in place for about two weeks.

Q How long does the treatment take?

A You will need to have at least two visits: the first for the preparation, impression, shade taking and fitting the temporary crown, and the second to fit the permanent crown.

Q Does it hurt to have a tooth prepared for a crown?

A No. A local anaesthetic is used and the preparation should feel no different from a filling. If the tooth does not have a nerve, and a post crown is being prepared, then local anaesthetic may not be needed.

Q Are post crowns different?

A Post crowns may be used when the tooth has been root filled. The weakened crown of the tooth is drilled off at the level of the gum. The dentist makes a double-ended ‘post’ to fit into the root canal. This can be either prefabricated stainless steel or custom made of gold. One end of the post is cemented into the root canal, and the other end holds the crown firmly in place.

Q Are there any alternatives to post crowns for root-filled teeth?

A If a root-filled tooth is not completely broken down, it may be possible to build it up again using filling material. This ‘core’ is then prepared in the same way as a natural tooth and the impressions are taken.

Q How long will a crown last?
A The life of a crown will depend on how well it is looked after. The crown itself cannot decay, but decay can start where the edge of the crown joins the tooth. It is very important to keep this area as clean as your other teeth, or decay could endanger the crown. Properly cared for crowns will last for many years – your dentist will be able to tell you how long.

Q How are crowns fixed to teeth?

A Once the fit and appearance of the crown has been checked – and approved by you – it will be cemented in place with special dental cement. The cement also forms a seal to help hold it firmly in place.

Q Will the crown feel different?

A Because the shape of the crown will be slightly different from the shape of your tooth before it was crowned, you may be aware of it to begin with. Within a few days it should feel fine, and you will not notice it. The crown may need some adjustment if it feels higher than the surrounding teeth. If it is at all uncomfortable ask your dentist to check and adjust it.

Q Is there an alternative to a crown?

A A veneer may be an alternative to having an anterior crown. Your dentist will advise you of any suitable alternatives.

FAQs About Porcelain Veneers in Leeds

Q What is a veneer?

A A veneer is a thin layer of porcelain made to fit over the front surface of a tooth, like a false fingernail fits over a nail.  Sometimes a natural colour ‘composite’ material is used instead of porcelain.
Q What are the advantages of veneers?

A Veneers make teeth look natural and healthy, and because they are very thin and are held in place by a special strong bond (rather like super-glue) very little preparation of the tooth is needed.
Q When would I need a veneer?

A Veneers can improve the colour, shape and position of teeth.  A precise shade of porcelain can be chosen to give the right colour to improve a single discoloured or stained tooth or to lighten front teeth (usually the upper ones) generally.  A veneer can make a chipped tooth look intact again.  The porcelain covers the whole of the front of the tooth with a thicker section replacing the broken part.  Veneers can also be used to close small gaps, when orthodontics (braces) are not suitable.  If one tooth is slightly out of position, a veneer can sometimes be fitted to bring it into line with the others.

Q What about alternatives?

A A natural-coloured filling material can be used for minor repairs to front teeth.  This is excellent where the tooth supports the filling, but may not work so well for broken tooth corners.  There will always be a join between the tooth and the filling material.

Crowns are used for teeth that need to be strengthened – either because they have broken, have been weakened by a very large filling, or have had root canal treatment.
Q How long will a veneer last?

A Veneers should last for many years, but they can chip or break, just as your own teeth can.  Your dentist will tell you how long each individual veneer should last.  Small chips can be repaired, or a new veneer fitted if necessary.
Q How are teeth prepared for a veneer?

A Some of the shiny outer enamel surface of the tooth may be removed, to make sure that the veneer can be bonded permanently in place later.  The amount of enamel removed is tiny and will be the same as the thickness of the veneer  to be fitted, so that the tooth stays the same size.  A local anaesthetic (injection) may be used to make sure that there is no discomfort, but often this is not necessary.  Once the tooth has been prepared, the dentist will take an ‘impression’.  This will be given to the dental technician, along with any other information needed to make the veneer.  The colour of the surrounding teeth is matched on a shade guide to make sure that the veneer will look entirely natural.
Q How long will it take?

A A veneer takes at least two visits; the first to prepare the tooth and to match the shade, and the second to fit it.  Before bonding it in place, your dentist will show you the veneer on your tooth to make sure you are happy with it.  Bonding a veneer in place is done with a special adhesive, which holds it firmly on the tooth.

Q Will I need a temporary veneer between visits?

A Because the preparation of the tooth is so slight you will probably not need a temporary veneer.  The tooth will look very much the same after preparation, but will feel slightly less smooth.
Q What happens after the veneer is fitted?

A Only minor adjustments can be made to the veneer after it is fitted.  It is usually best to wait a little while to get used to it before any changes are made.  Your dentist will probably want to check and polish it a week or so after it is fitted, and to make sure that you are happy with it.
Q How much will it cost?

A You can have veneers on the NHS.  However, many dentists prefer to provide cosmetic treatment privately.  It is important to discuss charges and treatment options with your dentist before starting treatment.

FAQs About White Fillings in Leeds

Q Why should I consider white fillings?

A Most people have fillings of one sort or another in their mouths. Nowadays fillings are not only functional, but can be natural looking as well.  Many people don’t want silver fillings that show when they laugh or smile because they are more conscious about the way they look.

Q Can I get them on the NHS?

A The National Health Service will not usually allow white fillings on the biting surfaces of back teeth.  However, this does not apply to the sides of back teeth or to any front teeth.

There is a slight chance that some people may be sensitive to the metals used in silver amalgam fillings.  If this sensitivity is proven, it may be best to replace the amalgam fillings with another type.  (In very exceptional cases these replacements may be available on the NHS, if a consultant decides that a patient is extremely sensitive to these materials and asks for them to be replaced.)
Q Are they expensive?

A Because many white fillings are only available privately, costs can vary quite a lot from dentist to dentist.  Costs usually depend on the size and type of white filling used and the time it takes to complete the treatment.  Costs may also vary from region to region.  As a guide, white fillings start from around £40 each, but your dentist will be able to give you an idea of the cost before you agree to treatment.
Q Are they as good as silver amalgam fillings?

A White fillings have always been considered less long lasting than
silver amalgam fillings.  But there are now new materials available with properties comparable to silver amalgam, and these are proving to be very successful.  The life expectancy of a white filling can depend greatly on where it is in your mouth and how heavily your teeth come together when you bite.  Your dentist can advise you on the life expectancy of your fillings.  However, any fillings provided on the NHS are automatically guaranteed for one year.
Q Is it worth replacing my amalgam fillings with white ones?

A It is usually best to change fillings only when your dentist decides that an old filling needs replacing.  If so you can ask to have it replaced in a tooth-coloured material.

Some dentists prefer not to put white fillings in back teeth, as they are not always successful.  One way around this would be to use crowns or inlays, but this can mean removing more of the tooth and can be more expensive.

Q  What are tooth-coloured fillings made of?

A  This can vary, but they are mainly made of glass particles, synthetic resin and a setting ingredient.  Your dentist should be able to give you more information about the particular material that they use.
Q Where can I get them done?

A  Most dental practices offer white fillings as a normal part of the treatment they give you.  However, white fillings are classed as a ‘cosmetic’ treatment, and you can therefore only have them if you pay for them.

Q  Are there any alternatives to fillings?

A  Adhesive dentistry is another form of this treatment.  This involves bonding the filling to the tooth.  The dentist has to remove less of the tooth, which is obviously better.

As we have already said, there are alternatives such as crowns and inlays although they can cost a lot more.  Veneers can be used on front teeth instead of crowns or fillings.

Our Leeds dentists provide gum disease treatments and provide solutions and tips for preventing gum diseases.
FAQs About Gum Disease in Leeds

Q What is gum disease?

A Gum disease describes swelling, soreness or infection of the tissues supporting the teeth.  There are two main forms of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Q What is gingivitis?

A Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums.  This is when the gums around the teeth become very red and swollen.  Often the swollen gums bleed when they are brushed during cleaning.

Q What is periodontal disease?

A Long-standing gingivitis can turn into periodontal disease.  There are a number of types of periodontal disease and they all affect the tissues supporting the teeth.  As the disease gets worse the bone anchoring the teeth in the jaw is lost, making the teeth loose.  If this is not treated, the teeth may eventually fall out.

Q Am I likely to suffer from gum disease?

A Probably.  Most people suffer from some form of gum disease, and it is the major cause of tooth loss in adults.  However, the disease develops very slowly in most people, and it can be slowed down to a rate that should allow you to keep most of your teeth for life.

Q What is the cause of gum disease?

A All gum disease is caused by plaque.  Plaque is a film of bacteria, which forms on the surface of the teeth and gums every day.  Many of the bacteria in plaque are completely harmless, but there are some that have been shown to be the main cause of gum disease.  To prevent and treat gum disease, you need to make sure you remove all the plaque from your teeth every day.  This is done by brushing and flossing.

Q What happens if gum disease is not treated?

A Unfortunately, gum disease progresses painlessly on the whole so that you do notice the damage it is doing.  However, the bacteria are sometimes more active and this makes your gums sore.  This can lead to gum abscesses, and pus may ooze from around the teeth.  Over a number of years, the bone supporting the teeth can be lost.  If the disease is left untreated for a long time, treatment can become more difficult.

Q How do I know if I have gum disease?

A The first sign is blood on the toothbrush or in the rinsing water when you clean your teeth.  Your gums may also bleed when you are eating, leaving a bad taste in your mouth.  Your breath may also become unpleasant.

Q What do I do if I think I have gum disease?

A The first thing to do is visit your dentist for a thorough check-up of your teeth and gums.  The dentist can measure the ‘cuff’ of gum around each tooth to see if there is any sign that periodontal disease has started.  X-rays may also be needed to see the amount of bone that has been lost.  This assessment is very important, so the correct treatment can be prescribed for you.

Q What treatments are needed?

A Your dentist will usually give your teeth a thorough clean.  You’ll also be shown how to remove plaque successfully yourself, cleaning all surfaces of your teeth thoroughly and effectively.  This may take a number of sessions with the dentist or hygienist.
Q What else may be needed?

A Once your teeth are clean, your dentist may decide to carry out further cleaning of the roots of the teeth, to make sure that the last pockets of bacteria are removed. You’ll probably need the treatment area to be numbed before
anything is done.  Afterwards, you may feel some discomfort for up to 48 hour.

Q Once I have had periodontal disease, can I get it again?

A Periodontal disease is never cured.  But as long as you keep up the home care you have been taught, any further loss of bone will be very slow and it may stop altogether.  However, you must make sure you remove plaque every day, and go for regular check ups by the dentist and hygienist.

Relevant Links
Leeds Dentist
Dentist in Leeds
About Leeds
Leeds Council
Dentist in West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire




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